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Team Jacob vs. Team Edward

Unless you’ve been living in a coffin for the past few years, you’ve heard the buzz about Twilight.  In the latest movies, small town heroine Bella finds herself being wooed by both a vampire named Edward and a werewolf named Jacob.  Fans are split between which creature she should end up with, and have divided themselves into two camps: Team Edward and Team Jacob.

At Groupable, we’ve developed a wide variety of procedures to measure how groups organize, aggregate, and communicate.  We’ve used these metrics to help sponsors identify everything from top Moms groups to top BBQ groups.  We decided to undertake our greatest challenge to date: settling the raging question of Team Edward vs. Team Jacob.

Challenge #1: Twitter Influence

We found hundreds of Jacob and Edward fan clubs in dozens of countries.  To best make sense of this, we located hundreds of groups who definitively self-identified as boosters of Jacob or Edward (excluding individuals or fans of the actors).  We ran these through our public influence calculator, available at http://influence.groupable.com/, which selected the top twenty Jacob and top twenty Edward accounts.

The comparison of the top twenty accounts are graphed below, with the Groupable Influence Score displayed on the y-axis (100 representing highest).  The first place twitter accounts on the charts are on the left.

Edward Jacob
Highest Score 98 77
Lowest Score 36 47
Average Score 59.6 59.7
Median Score 54 59

The results here are inconclusive.  The top Team Edwards accounts are more influential than the top Team Jacob accounts, but exhibit a quick dropoff in quality after the top ten.  The rank and file Team Jacob fan tends to be more influential.  We give the slight edge to Team Edward for commanding the most influence at the top.

Challenge #2: Sentiment Analysis

For this challenge, we looked into what people were actually saying about the two camps.  We sampled conversations about Team Edward and Team Jacob from Twitter, Facebook, podcasts, video sites, and blogs.  The first thing we measured was the volume of people who declared support for Team Jacob or Team Edward:

This came out as a slight win for Team Jacob, with 56% of people pledging support for Team Jacob over 44% in favor of Team Edward.  When we dug a bit deeper, we did see some bad news for Team Jacob.  Our analytics engine measured the sentiment surrounding each conversation, to determine how positive or negative people felt about the various teams:

As you can see above, although Team Jacob had more supporters, he also had more enemies.  Many more people spoke out against Jacob, especially rabid Edward fans.  Sentiment towards Team Edward was smaller, but 95% of mentions were positive, while sentiment towards Team Jacob was larger, but only 88% of mentions were positive.

We interpret this as a slight win for Team Jacob, since he garnered the most vote share, love him or hate him.

Challenge #3: Facebook Influence

On Facebook, we saw a clear win for Team Jacob.  As of the time this study was published, 155,174 people joined the Team Jacob fan page, while just 60,363 joined the Team Edward fan page.

Though the Team Edward fans were marginally more likely to be influencers among their community (by a slim 52-48 margin), they got drowned out by the sheer numbers.  Big edge to Team Jacob.

Conclusion:

We pitted Jacob against Edward in three social media challenges, based on our sponsor’s analytics platform.  At the end of the three rounds, we found Team Jacob prevailed.  Although Team Edwards had slightly more influence in the Twitterverse, Team Jacob had the most raw support across different platforms.  Love him or hate him, he’s the hot topic right now.

Groupable Names Most Influential BBQ Groups in Honor of Father’s Day

Let’s hear it for the dads. We got a lot of buzz from our Mother’s Day “moms group” study, so today we’re announcing our list of the most active and influential dad-related groups. This year’s list focuses on groups involved with one of the most traditional Father’s Day activities - the backyard barbecue. The Top 10 list ranks BBQ groups who are among the most engaged within their socio-demographic target and who have the greatest potential to influence buying decisions.

Based on our proprietary Groupability Index, influence ratings take into account Groupable’s sponsorship activity data as well as activity from a variety of social media data points including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Klout Score, blogs, and podcasts. The index rating is calculated based upon aggregate scores in the following categories: authenticity, engagement and relevance.

Barbecues and dads go hand-in-hand on Father’s Day. The barbecue is one of the oldest cooking methods known to man. It’s a primal, social and unifying experience, and it smells good, too. Dads who are part of these groups are passionate and influential about the art and enjoyment of this activity. These are the types of groups brands like to reach. Brands can use Groupable’s ratings as a filter to find groups that will be both responsive to marketing initiatives as well as influential in spreading the word of these brand experiences.

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Groupable Names Most Influential Moms Groups

Today we announced its list of the most active and influential moms groups. Our Top 100 list ranks moms groups who are among the most engaged within their socio-demographic target and who have the greatest potential to influence buying decisions.

Based on our proprietary Groupability Index, influence ratings take into account Groupable’s sponsorship activity data as well as activity from variety of social media data points including Twitter, Facebook, YouTube, Klout Score, blogs, and podcasts. The index rating is calculated based upon aggregate scores in the following categories: authenticity, engagement and relevance.

Moms GROUPS represent the most passionate part of a very influential consumer segment. This list shows that influence is more than just Twitter followers. Brands can use Groupable’s ratings as a filter to find groups that will be both responsive to marketing initiatives as well as influential in spreading the word of these brand experiences.

The following are Groupable’s Top 10 out of the 100 most socially influential moms groups*:

Rank Group Name

Groupability Index (GI)

Updates/Day

Followers Engagement
1

Work It Mom

84

3.2

3,879 Average
2

Parent Hacks

80

7.2

14,643 High
3

Manic Mommies

79

1.2

2,451 High
4

Amazing Moms

78

1.4

25,848 Average
5

Boston Mamas

77

23.3

4,029 Very High
6

Cool Mom

73

1.8

5,407 Average
7

Rookie Moms

68

8.0

20,110 High
8

Moms at Work

65

8.5

36,938 High
9

Green Moms

65

13.4

21,568 Average
10

Mommy Poppins

64

3.0

3,798 High

*Representative data points for the GI formula

We believe that a group’s collective influence and ability to spread a message can reach a much wider audience as compared to that of an individual. It’s about knowing which groups to engage with so as to maximize word-of-mouth equity. The Groupability Index provides marketers with a single reference point that captures a group’s ultimate influence potential.

For a complete list of the Top 100 Most Influential Moms, email us. For more Top 5 Influential group lists, go to http://influence.groupable.com/leaderboard

Top 5 Strategies to Organize Your Group on Twitter

Our recent survey discovered groups find Twitter very useful to network with other groups, but did not know how to use it to organize their own group. The fact of the matter is that groups who communicate internally using Twitter tend to be better organized and grow faster than other groups.

To help crack the code, Groupable presents the five steps your group should take today to turn Twitter into an invaluable organizing tool.

1. Get Your Group Members to Register on Twitter.

At your next meeting, tell every member of your group to create a personal Twitter account and follow your group account (make sure to follow them back!) Most of your group has probably heard about Twitter by now, but many could use a helping hand to get them started. Explain to them how Twitter has been useful to network with other groups, and how you want to use Twitter to help organize your group going forward. Give them a quick rundown of the basics, and volunteer to answer any questions they may have along the way.

2. Set Up a List with All Your Group Members

As your group members enter the Twittersphere, create a list exclusively for members of your group. This will quickly become your definitive membership list to keep track of your members online. You’ll find it to be useful for messaging and capturing a snapshot of what your group is talking about. Additionally, if your group is seeking sponsorship, it helps prove your group’s authenticity and traction.

3. Post Your Twitter Feed on Your Group’s Website

One of the most useful features of Twitter is its ability to be shared on many sites. Groupable, Facebook, MySpace, LinkedIn and most blogging software makes it easy to stream your group’s Twitter feed on your site. If you edit your website manually, Twitter has a simple script you can embed to stream your tweets. This will allow you to update all your sites simply by posting a single status update to Twitter.

4. Encourage Your Group to Sign Up for Text Message Updates

If you text “follow groupable” to 40404, you’ll receive a text message every time we update our Twitter account. Your group account can be followed by replacing groupable with your Twitter handle. Ask your group to sign up for instant status updates on their phone, so they can receive instant communication wherever they go.  They don’t even need a Twitter account to do this.

If you get your entire group to do this, you’ll make phone trees obsolete. Simply tweet “Tonight’s meeting changed to Mary’s house” and everybody will get the message.  Be careful not to use Twitter frivolously if you if you do this, or your group will resent getting text messages about what sandwich you ate for lunch!

5. Track your Influence Score

Groupable makes it easy to see if your Twitter strategy is working or not. Simply visit http://influence.groupable.com/ and register your Twitter handle. You can track your influence throughout the Twitter world and watch it rise as you continue to organize. You can also embed your score on your webpage to let the world know your group takes its mission seriously.

Groupable’s influence status — we’re still working our way up too.

Analysis of Group Twitter Usage

We recently conducted a survey to find out how groups were using Twitter. Did regular groups find it an indispensable tool? Or a meaningless distraction? The answer, not surprisingly, is “it depends.”

We started by asking groups to rate how useful they found Twitter for performing the most common group functions. They rated actions on a five point scale, with five being “most useful” and 1 being the “least useful.”

Groups gave Twitter high marks for its ability to network with other groups, but low marks as a tool for communicating within its own group. In essence, it’s more valuable for external communication than internal communication.

This is partially explained by the results to our question, “What percentage of your group actively uses Twitter.” On average, 14.8% of the membership of any given group use Twitter. With such a small percentage of rank and file group members on Twitter, it’s little surprise that Twitter is not yet often used for group organizing.

Usage Statistics

The popularity of Twitter services like CoTweet and HootSuite, which help many users maintain a single Twitter account, demonstrates that a single Twitter handle often has many drivers. We wanted to see how many sets of keys exist.

The majority of group twitter handles, 58%, are maintained by more than a single person. The average number of users lurking behind a single handle is 7.8, with a median of 3. About one in ten Twitter handles have an ownership in the double, or sometimes triple, digits.

Furthermore, these people are paying attention. The typical group member checked their group’s Twitter account 2.5 times a week, or about every other day.

Essentially, for every group you interact with on Twitter, you should assume the immediate audience is three to eight times higher. If your social media interaction is strong enough to trickle down to the 85.2% of the group who don’t use Twitter, your message will be amplified an additional sevenfold.

Groups are the gateway to building effective offline word-of-mouth. Contact Groupable today for best practices in targeted group engagement.